Something more than Episode 20: On the trail of Faust

For those regular readers of my blog, as you can see, over the past weeks I have used this as a show-notes page for my podcast, “Light Through the Past.” This one will be no different in the sense that below are the main sources for what I discussed this week, namely, two passages treating Simon the Magician as magus, sorcerer, and the consort of demons, and especially as they pertain to the future great Magus, Faust.

It is not without warrant that Simon Magus becomes in Medieval thought a heresiarch greater than which cannot be thought, in that he consorts with the devil, withstands both St. Peter (as Pope) and St. Paul, and sought as a foreshadow of Antichrist, to cast himself even as God to be worshipped as God.

You can find the Podcast here.

Faust, whose name in Latin means lucky, favorable, or auspicious, was the name, depending upon the text, of either Simon Magus’s brother or father.

Mephistopheles Whispering to Faust
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The Eagles are Coming!!!

My recent appearance on the Amon Sûl podcast, which you can find HERE!!

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A Day of Four Things

In the past I have always tried to post on this day, 24 June.

First, it is the Feast of the Nativity of the Forerunner.

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Episode 19 (after a hiatus with 18): Did St. Paul Betray Jesus: Hellenization You Say?

This week’s episode is found here.

Today we look at the question of Hellenization, that is, did the Gospel’s encounter with Greek thought alter the content of the Gospels?

St. Paul preaching on Mars Hill, Raphael

This opinion, as we will see, has been championed mostly by Protestants with an axe to grind with Roman Catholicism, liberal Protestants (the great historian of Theology, Adolph von Harnack) with axe’s to grind against supernatural religion, and even some Catholics (Petavius) who sought thereby to defend the absolute prerogative of the Popes in determining and establishing Doctrine.

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Episode 17: “What Hath Plato (& Philo) to do with Athanasius? Alexandria as the Intellectual Heart of the Mediterranean World.”

Philo the Jew, from the Nuremberg Chronicle

Today’s episode is found here!

The Passage from the Theaetetus.

But it is not possible, Theodorus, that evil should be destroyed—for there must always be something opposed to the good; nor is it possible that it should have its seat in heaven. But it must inevitably haunt human life, and prowl about this earth. That is why a man should make all haste to escape from earth to heaven; and escape means becoming as like God as possible (John M. Cooper, Plato. Complete Works. {Indianapolis: Hackett Publications, 1997} 195).

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Episode 16: The Montanists Athwart the Church’s First 170 Years

Today we look at the Phrygian heresy, often referred to as Montanism, after the name of its founder, Montanus.

You can find the link here.

What information we have of the Montanists, apart from the writings of Tertullian, whom we shall treat in the coming weeks, we find in Eusebius’s Ecclesiastical History, Book V.

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Episode 15: The Apostolic and Eucharistic Ministry of the Church

Here are the notes and works I cite, in order, from St. Hippolytus, St. Clement of Rome, and St. Ignatios of Antioch all for your reference as we cover how the ancient Church understood what it was doing, where they got this structure from, and why both are integral to the life of the Church.

Episode 15 is here!

St. Hippolytus Apostolic Constitutions

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Episode 14: St. Irenaeus & Bishops as the Repositories of the Apostolic Ministry

Episode 15 can be found here!

St. Irenaeus on the Succession and Teaching of the Roman Church

But when they {the Gnostics} are refuted from the Scriptures they turn around and attack the Scriptures themselves, saying that they are not correct, or authoritative, and that the truth cannot be found from them by those who are not acquainted with the tradition. For this [they say] was not handed down in writing, but orally, which is why Paul said, “We speak wisdom among the perfect, but not the wisdom of this world.” Each of them utters a wisdom which he has made up, or rather a fiction, so that according to them the truth was once to be found in Valentinus, then at another time in Marcion, at another time in Cerinthus, then later in Basilides, or was also in that opponent, who has no saving message to utter. Each one of them is wholly perverse, and is not ashamed to preach himself, corrupting the rule of faith.

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Episode 13 The Obscure (and even Messy) History of the Monoepiscopacy prior to A.D. 150

You can find this week’s episode here.

You can find this week’s episode here.

Perry Robinson’s excellent treatment of Apostolic Succession, riffing off the very good treatment found in Felix Cirlot’s Apostolic Succession: Is It True?

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Two Questions Along the Way to St. Irenaeus and Bishops

This week, episode 12 for 5 May 2022, I am answering questions.

The first is from my nephew, Billy Jenkins, who has been on my other podcast, Path to the Academy (which you can hear here).

And the second comes from none other than AFR podcaster and cohost of The Areopagaus, Pastor Mike Landsman. I have been the happy guest of Pastor Mike and Fr. Andrew Stephen Damick on a number of occasions, (going backward through time) including here, here, here, here, here, and here. (The last one is on my book, Calvin’s Tormentors.)

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